Healthy Summer Grilling

grilling-hero

Summer is well underway and we are spending our weekends out in the backyard grilling up a tasty feast, well this obsession with grilling could come at a risk, as the process of grilling forms molecules called polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) which have been shown to damage DNA and thus increase the eater’s chances of developing colon cancer. For the majority of us who love nothing better than a barmy summers day and a great grilled steak, this is a real shame.…


But as all seems hopeless a group of scientists led by Dr. Isabel Ferreira of the University of Porto, in Portugal, think they may of found a way around the problem. When grilling meat, suggesting that, you should add beer, yes beer!.…


The suggestion of using beer comes from some very serious research. A paper recently published by Dr. Ferreira in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry explains that the PAH's formed by grilling are created from molecules we know as free radicals which, themselves form from the fat and protein in the meat when exposed to very high heat as found in grilling. They suggest that one possible way of reducing this PAH formation is to introduce chemicals called antioxidants  to soak up the free radicals. Beers are found to be rich in these chemicals in the form of melanoidins, formed from the process of roasting barley.…


And so, Dr. Ferreira  and her team, set about preparing beer marinades, brought the meat and fired up the bbq.…


They tested a selection of beer marinade; one a light pale pilsner lager, a second darker black beer. As darker beers tend to have more melanoidins than the lighter beers, the teams hypothesis was that the meat coated in the dark beer would result in less PAH's than those basted in the light beer, which in turn would have less than the control un-basted meat.…


The results came back as predicted. After cooking, the beer that was not marinated showed an average of 21 nanograms of PHA's per gram, with those that were basted in light beer gave an average of 18 nanograms PHA. The dark beer samples showed a remarkable average of only 10 nanograms PHA per gram of meat.…


So open that extra bottle of stout and get basting that T-Bone, its healthier for you and tastes great too.…


Dr. Jacqueline Nguyen

Dr. Jacqueline Nguyen

Dr. Jacqueline Nguyen is a distinguished Clinical Pharmacist who graduated from the University of Southern California School of Pharmacy (USC) in May 1998. From working as a pharmacist for over a decade, she has learned that a successful clinical pharmacist needs to have certain essential attributes: attention to detail, genuine care for patients, the ability to understand a patient’s desires, the experience and continuing education to care for a patient’s overall health and an uncompromising commitment to stay abreast with cutting-edge medical treatments and alternative natural treatments to help patients.